Eric Bossik

Eric Bossik

Bio:

Eric Bossik is a classical realist who uses a variety of mediums to create still life, portrait, and figurative art. Eric graduated from The School of Visual Arts with a BFA, he later advanced his studies with John Frederick Murray, a fine artist whose instructional lineage can be traced back to the Ecole des Beaux-Arts and old master artist Jacques Louis David. Eric started out illustrating book covers for Harper Collins Publishers and then worked as a staff mural artist for Mode Works and Evergreene Studios in New York City. He painted murals for numerous clients, including Planet Hollywood, as well as trompe l’oeil for the Beau Rivage casino in Mississippi. Eric was an instructor at the Armory Art Center in West Palm Beach, Florida for eight years, where he taught oil painting and charcoal drawing courses. He’s been teaching private classes and workshops in his South Florida art studio for the past 14 years. Eric is the author of the instructional oil painting e-book, How to Create an Underpainting Like the Old Masters: A Step-By-Step Guide. He is featured in the instructional art video, Underpainting Secrets for Artists, based on his e-book. He has also produced the instructional video, Drawing Lesson For Beginners. He has exhibited at the Albertson Peterson Gallery in Winter Park, Florida, the Master Eagle galleries in New York City, the Grand Armée Gallery in Palm Beach, Florida, the Images Gallery in Boca Raton, Florida, and the Linda White Gallery in Delray Beach, Florida. Eric’s paintings and drawings have also been exhibited at the American International Fine Art Fair (AIFAF) in West Palm Beach, the Society of Illustrators, the Salmagundi Art Club, the Art Director’s Club of New York, the Heckscher Museum, the Roslyn Fine Arts Museum, the Boca Raton Museum of Art, the Armory Art Center in West Palm Beach, the Cornell Museum in Delray Beach, Florida, and the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County. Eric’s artwork is created with time tested materials, methods and techniques used by artists going all the way back to the 17th Century.